Filters:

"Spotlight" is a Valentine to investigative journalism and a stark reminder of where we’re headed now that this brand of writing has become an endangered species.

Overplotted and at least 20 minutes too long, the film opens big, slogs through its middle act, and recovers for a rousing conclusion.

From a historical perspective, "Suffragette" is riddled with inaccuracies, but that's less of a problem than its questionable dramatic arc.

Despite several high octane action sequences, this movie feels orphaned and works considerably better when viewed as part of a greater epic than as a stand-alone production.

Run Time: 2:02
U.S. Release Date: 2015-10-09
MPAA Rating: "R" (Profanity)
Genre: Drama
Director: Danny Boyle
Cast: Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels, Sarah Snook, Katherine Waterston, Michael Stuhlberg

"Steve Jobs" doesn’t so much tear down the myth of the man as reshape it into something more volatile.

Run Time: 2:01
U.S. Release Date: 2015-10-02
MPAA Rating: "R" (Violence, Profanity, Sexual Content)
Genre: Thriller
Director: Denis Villeneuve
Cast: Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro, Daniel Kaluuya

An unforgettable motion picture that should be on the must-see list for anyone who appreciates films that deal in grays rather than blacks and whites.

A 2015 re-visitation of the 1999 "Star Wars" movie, "The Phantom Menace." Not an attempt to expunge the original review but a new look at the oft-reviled film from a different perspective.

Run Time: 1:37
U.S. Release Date: 2015-08-21
MPAA Rating: "R" (Violence, Disturbing Images, Profanity)
Genre: Horror
Director: Ciaran Foy
Cast: James Ransone, Shannyn Sossamon, Robert Daniel Sloan, Dartanian Sloan, Lea Coco

More like an unnecessary retread than an organic extension of the original.

Run Time: 2:04
U.S. Release Date: 2015-07-24
MPAA Rating: "R" (Violence, Profanity)
Genre: Drama
Director: Antoine Fuqua
Cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Forest Whitaker, Rachel McAdams, Oona Laurence, 50 Cent, Naomie Harris

Antoine Fuqua has crafted something unusual in this day of cookie-cutter blockbusters and overwrought dramas: a serious, sincere summer motion picture.

"Self/less" is too badly made to entertain audiences in search of escapist entertainment and too insulting for viewers hoping for more.