Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Thu Oct 23, 2014 5:18 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16385 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 526, 527, 528, 529, 530, 531, 532 ... 820  Next
Last Movie You Watched 
Author Message
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I got through half of A Serbian Film. I can't remember why I didn't finish it, but it wasn't because it was boring or anything like that. I do, though, remember thinking, "This is silly." I also remember thinking about the filmmaker, "You need to calm down." After considering Mark's analysis, maybe calming down wasn't the right option. You have to give a filmmaker credit for achieving the goals he or she sets out to accomplish, but one wonders how admirable A Serbian Film's goals are. Mark thinks they're at least somewhat admirable, as an expression of rage over the current state of Serbia. I'm not sure I buy it, but even if I don't buy it, it's still a more admirable that what something like Hit and Run's trying to do. I'll take failed or haphazard goals over senseless money grabs any day.


Sat Aug 25, 2012 3:46 pm
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:43 pm
Posts: 773
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Pedro wrote:
I got through half of A Serbian Film. I can't remember why I didn't finish it, but it wasn't because it was boring or anything like that. I do, though, remember thinking, "This is silly." I also remember thinking about the filmmaker, "You need to calm down." After considering Mark's analysis, maybe calming down wasn't the right option. You have to give a filmmaker credit for achieving the goals he or she sets out to accomplish, but one wonders how admirable A Serbian Film's goals are. Mark thinks they're at least somewhat admirable, as an expression of rage over the current state of Serbia. I'm not sure I buy it, but even if I don't buy it, it's still a more admirable that what something like Hit and Run's trying to do. I'll take failed or haphazard goals over senseless money grabs any day.


The goals set by A Serbian Film are more likely better appreciated by a Serbian audience, a member of which I am not. I do believe the film has enough fire that any viewer will unlikely miss the conviction with which it was made. I don't want many movies to look or sound like it but, as Pedro is getting at, I don't want to see any movies that look or sound like Hit and Run. I didn't claim it was great and wouldn't attempt to convince anyone that it's great art. It isn't. There are other ways to hit the same points and make the film read well for a broader audience. A Serbian Film didn't do that and neither did Enter The Void or other difficult films that are impressive, idiosyncratic personal statements.

_________________
Which are you drinking? The water or the wave?


Sat Aug 25, 2012 7:25 pm
Profile
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
Pedro wrote:
I got through half of A Serbian Film. I can't remember why I didn't finish it, but it wasn't because it was boring or anything like that. I do, though, remember thinking, "This is silly." I also remember thinking about the filmmaker, "You need to calm down." After considering Mark's analysis, maybe calming down wasn't the right option. You have to give a filmmaker credit for achieving the goals he or she sets out to accomplish, but one wonders how admirable A Serbian Film's goals are. Mark thinks they're at least somewhat admirable, as an expression of rage over the current state of Serbia. I'm not sure I buy it, but even if I don't buy it, it's still a more admirable that what something like Hit and Run's trying to do. I'll take failed or haphazard goals over senseless money grabs any day.


The goals set by A Serbian Film are more likely better appreciated by a Serbian audience, a member of which I am not. I do believe the film has enough fire that any viewer will unlikely miss the conviction with which it was made. I don't want many movies to look or sound like it but, as Pedro is getting at, I don't want to see any movies that look or sound like Hit and Run. I didn't claim it was great and wouldn't attempt to convince anyone that it's great art. It isn't. There are other ways to hit the same points and make the film read well for a broader audience. A Serbian Film didn't do that and neither did Enter The Void or other difficult films that are impressive, idiosyncratic personal statements.

I enjoyed Hit And Run and wouldn't mind more films being like it(Dax Sheperd did all the car stunts himself, no CGI whatsoever, so if nothing else I respect him for that level of comittment) but i'm sure most countries have their own "Serbian Film" in a way, for South Korea, there's "I Saw The Devil" ,for Japan, there's Ichi The Killer, Hong Kong has "The Lunatics" and son on and so forth. Serbian viewers seem to be rather divided on the film, some appreciated it's point, while others thought it went way too far and we're ashamed of the film.


Sat Aug 25, 2012 7:53 pm
Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1494
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
The critics didn't care for this one too much! They all seem to say that though the movie sucked, it sucked in ways that deeply moved them.


a woman with a S&S vote included it in her ballot

Quote:
Furthermore, the controversial A Serbian Film is, I must confess, my favourite film. It presents some of the darkest human impulses as somewhat desireable and dares to posit its plot as a political allegory that contains real emotional punch – I cried in the press screening. It is a film that affects horror fanatics and mainstream viewers alike – my students simply stated that it is impossible to un-see.


http://explore.bfi.org.uk/sightandsound ... /voter/440


Sat Aug 25, 2012 7:56 pm
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:56 pm
Posts: 1077
Location: Warner Robins, GA
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Inglorious Basterds - pretty much Tarentino's best film IMO. Love Brad Pitt and Christoph Waltz

El Mariachi - Robert Rodriguez's $7000 debut; it also had a running commentary that went over most of the production, etc.

Finally found the server with all th emovies and music on it, so Happy birthday to me for the next 6 months.


Sat Aug 25, 2012 8:01 pm
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2009 1:35 am
Posts: 2117
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
ParaNorman is a lot of fun and quite well done. It's even got a good story. The only question I had is why it wasn't released in October instead of the end of August. Competition too stiff?

_________________
Evil does not wear a bonnet!--Mr. Tinkles


Sat Aug 25, 2012 10:21 pm
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:43 pm
Posts: 773
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
I enjoyed Hit And Run and wouldn't mind more films being like it(Dax Sheperd did all the car stunts himself, no CGI whatsoever, so if nothing else I respect him for that level of comittment) but i'm sure most countries have their own "Serbian Film" in a way, for South Korea, there's "I Saw The Devil" ,for Japan, there's Ichi The Killer, Hong Kong has "The Lunatics" and son on and so forth. Serbian viewers seem to be rather divided on the film, some appreciated it's point, while others thought it went way too far and we're ashamed of the film.


The movies listed are only related to one another in that they're all violent/excessive and don't bear comparison in any other regard.

Changing films, Bernie was pretty good. Jack Black is Bernie, an effeminate assistant funeral director that eventually finds his way into the good graces - and eventual employment - of Marjorie Nugent (Shirley MacLaine), only to find that he's effectively held captive by the relationship. The movie offers a view of Carthage, TX and the people therein, a typical American blip on the radar. Writer/director Richard Linklater has a smidgeon of fun with these people and their outlook (do I have to avoid spoilers for a movie that wouldn't exist if it didn't make the papers?) but the film isn't in the business of mocking the justice system, small town America or any of the subjects it lightly touches upon. Black's performance is a different mode for the actor, MacLaine is great for her share of the film and it all ends without any audience lives being changed. Solid movie, worth a look. ***

_________________
Which are you drinking? The water or the wave?


Sun Aug 26, 2012 1:02 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:56 pm
Posts: 1077
Location: Warner Robins, GA
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Things We Lost In The Fire - Benicio del Toro and Halle Berry's family deal with th eloss of her husband, David Duchovny. I really liked the understated aspect of the film, with del Toro as a recvering drug addict in great form. I'm not a fan of Berry, but thought she did a workmanlike job here.


Sun Aug 26, 2012 4:54 pm
Profile
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
The Gold Rush (1925) ***

I had heard great things about this fairly early Chaplin but wasn't whelmed by it. Like many silent comedies, it's better in little bursts and spurts (e.g. the justly famous potato dance) than in the sum of its parts, and while I will remember scenes from it, I won't remember enjoying it overmuch.


If only I could work up an interest in watching The Gold Rush. There are some movies that are important and I'd like to see and then there are those movies that I feel obligated to see in order to honor the geek blood pact. I don't know if I could enjoy this Chaplin much right now -- too much juggling, something I couldn't watch to enjoy. I respect those that seek these classics out; I used to be one of you.


PeachyPete wrote:
Agreed completely. It's a movie that has it's moments, but I have no idea why it's held up as one of Chaplin's best works. I'd really love to hear someone who has a passion for this one defend it, because I just plain don't get it.


I'd like to know which version of the film you gentlemen have seen. I'd wager that it's Chaplin's preferred version. If it's the original, I'd be crushed. You see, Chaplin decided years later to make several "minor" changes to improve the film. All told, it's just a few scenes that are cut. But I always thought those scenes critical. It turns the film from a great tragedy into a more hopeful romantic comedy. At least that's the way I saw it. Pity that most of the restorations have been of the re-release and not the much superior original.


Sun Aug 26, 2012 8:17 pm
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2009 1:35 am
Posts: 2117
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Paisà (aka Paisan), the second of Rossellini's War Trilogy, is a series of six twenty-minute segments set against the American invasion of Italy. These range from okay (Naples), to really good (Sicily, Rome, The Apennines), to keeping me on the edge of my seat (Florence). Maria Michi, who was one of the few actors I didn't like in Rome, Open City, is moving in the Rome segment as a prostitute who is reunited with her old lover who doesn't recognize her. (It's fortunate he doesn't because he's dumb as a box of rocks, and if you combine that with her looks, well, what if they had a daughter?)

The Florence segment concerns two people who are trying to cross the Arno to the north bank, which is still occupied by Germans, although substantial parts have been taken over by partisans. They hope to get news of their loved ones without being shot by either side. This segment is fast-paced and exciting, and written by Federico Fellini.

The last segment takes place behind enemy lines in the Po valley, with the partisans joining with OSS officers fighting the Germans. This is episodic, with moments of real power, but didn't seem to hold together quite as well as the other segments. There are some really haunting images here.

This film was made in 1946, so it wasn't quite as big a struggle to make as Rome, Open City, but it was still difficult, which sometimes (particularly in the first half of the Sicilian segment and all of the Naples segment) makes the acting seem amateurish--most of the cast is non-actors. But this also give the film a lot of power, particularly in the second half of the Sicilian segment, where an Italian girl and American soldier struggle to communicate though neither of them speak the other's language. Italian neo-realism began because of necessity.

_________________
Evil does not wear a bonnet!--Mr. Tinkles


Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:49 pm
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7488
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
ed_metal_head wrote:
Mark III wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
The Gold Rush (1925) ***

I had heard great things about this fairly early Chaplin but wasn't whelmed by it. Like many silent comedies, it's better in little bursts and spurts (e.g. the justly famous potato dance) than in the sum of its parts, and while I will remember scenes from it, I won't remember enjoying it overmuch.


If only I could work up an interest in watching The Gold Rush. There are some movies that are important and I'd like to see and then there are those movies that I feel obligated to see in order to honor the geek blood pact. I don't know if I could enjoy this Chaplin much right now -- too much juggling, something I couldn't watch to enjoy. I respect those that seek these classics out; I used to be one of you.


PeachyPete wrote:
Agreed completely. It's a movie that has it's moments, but I have no idea why it's held up as one of Chaplin's best works. I'd really love to hear someone who has a passion for this one defend it, because I just plain don't get it.


I'd like to know which version of the film you gentlemen have seen. I'd wager that it's Chaplin's preferred version. If it's the original, I'd be crushed. You see, Chaplin decided years later to make several "minor" changes to improve the film. All told, it's just a few scenes that are cut. But I always thought those scenes critical. It turns the film from a great tragedy into a more hopeful romantic comedy. At least that's the way I saw it. Pity that most of the restorations have been of the re-release and not the much superior original.


Hmmmm I saw whichever was on Instant

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Sun Aug 26, 2012 10:30 pm
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:43 pm
Posts: 773
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mission To Mars -- **1/2

Brian De Palma's boyhood readings of Fantastic Adventures get a mixed-bag tribute in Mission To Mars, a visually inspired but sterile retread of Spielberg's brilliant Close Encounters of the Third Kind, itself inspired from the same material. De Palma matches every good or great idea (an amazing single shot that flies around the interior of a space station at every possible angle, the thrilling events/visuals of the "attack" that warrants a rescue mission, the surprisingly harrowing attempted rescue of Tim Robbins during which the viewer, and the rest of the actors in the scene, get the feeling they're communicating with a ghost) with an equal and opposite bad idea (the preservation of kiddie sci-fi dialogue, across-the-board flat performances, and an end that too obviously tips its hat to the kind of science fiction that inspired the older, more homage-happy De Palma). Some might argue that the "bad ideas" are actually consistent with the rest of the good stuff, a sign that De Palma was willing to go the distance with this material. My take is that the project looks too beautiful and sounds too silly to be taken as anything other than a hugely ambitious, goofy boyhood dream. There's merit in that and the film closes in on success without quite getting there.

One thing I found particularly amusing in the light of Close Encounters:

When Richard Dreyfuss gets on that alien ship, he's realizing a dream harbored since his early boyhood, a perfect moment where the risk matches his wonder.

When Gary Sinise gets on that alien ship, he's doing so as a kind of afterthought; "Well, shit, my dead wife said on that one video that I was intended to go to distant lands so here I go bye guys THE END."

Never, ever trust a movie that uses the dreaded cliche of Painful Memories: The Convenient Videotape. Every mourning parent, ever bereaved spouse... why, why oh why do they always watch those last birthday parties, those bittersweet baby showers?

_________________
Which are you drinking? The water or the wave?


Mon Aug 27, 2012 3:35 am
Profile
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Foul Play (1978)

Writer/director Colin Higgins (Harold and Maude, 9 To 5, Silver Streak) channels his inner Hitchcock as we follow Gloria Mundy, a divorced librarian who "takes a chance" and picks up a stranded motorist along the coastal highway outside of San Francisco. He's on the run and leaves something with Gloria (unbeknownst to her) that he does not want his pursuers to have, which puts her in danger and sends her down a path to trying to stop an assassination attempt with skeptical police lieutenant Tony Carlson (Chevy Chase) in tow.

The movie has plenty of red herrings and a big fat Macguffin to get things rolling. The comedy isn't as broad as the Hitchcock parody/homage High Anxiety, but Higgins definitely borrows some tricks from the suspense master's playbook and plays some scenes and encounters strictly for laughs. This one is almost equal parts action, comedy and love story with Dudley Moore, Billy Barty and Burgess Meredith adding to the levity. Chase is a bit wooden at parts, and his one liners mostly fall flat (they may have been more effective in 1978), but he and Goldie have an easy chemistry that for the most part works well.

I had seen this movie a few times on network TV in my youth, but this was the first time I had seen it uncut. Wow...what a difference. Some of the sexual innuendo/awakening stuff from that era had been left untouched for the TV broadcasts, but I was surprised at the level of stuff that was cut. The old lady Scrabble game alone takes on an entirely new level of humor and "shock" in the uncut theatrical version. The rating wasn't available in 1978, but this would have definitely been a PG-13 affair instead of the PG rating it received at the time.

Overall this is an enjoyable movie if you're looking for a distraction. A pretty fun chase scene through the streets of San Francisco and some off the wall humor means you won't be bored anyway. Special props to the late William Frankfather who plays the ruthless albino hitman who is silent for the whole movie. Those eyes, man...those eyes! 2.5 / 4.0


Mon Aug 27, 2012 12:50 pm
Director
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:56 pm
Posts: 1077
Location: Warner Robins, GA
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Oldboy - from Korea, it tells the story of a man who while trying to make his way home for his daughter's 3rd birthday party, gets kidnapped and then spends the next 15 years in confinement. One day he's released and he seeks out revenge on those who jailed him. I only saw sporadic clips since its release, and based on those, I htought the violence factor would be ratcheted up more than what transpired. The side shot of the 20 on 1 fight was pretty good, and the teeth/tongue scenes were creepy enough, but this ends up as more of a detective story with the "good" guy trying to hunt down the "bad" guy. That's a very simple way to describe what I (and maybe more than a few others) probably thought they were going to see, but as the end comes closer, it becomes much more than that; we see a Greek Tragedy, owing a lot to Odysseus and his downfall. That became more creepy than anything referenced in the film, teeth and tongue included.


Mon Aug 27, 2012 4:59 pm
Profile
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
Mission To Mars -- **1/2

Brian De Palma's boyhood readings of Fantastic Adventures get a mixed-bag tribute in Mission To Mars, a visually inspired but sterile retread of Spielberg's brilliant Close Encounters of the Third Kind, itself inspired from the same material. De Palma matches every good or great idea (an amazing single shot that flies around the interior of a space station at every possible angle, the thrilling events/visuals of the "attack" that warrants a rescue mission, the surprisingly harrowing attempted rescue of Tim Robbins during which the viewer, and the rest of the actors in the scene, get the feeling they're communicating with a ghost) with an equal and opposite bad idea (the preservation of kiddie sci-fi dialogue, across-the-board flat performances, and an end that too obviously tips its hat to the kind of science fiction that inspired the older, more homage-happy De Palma). Some might argue that the "bad ideas" are actually consistent with the rest of the good stuff, a sign that De Palma was willing to go the distance with this material. My take is that the project looks too beautiful and sounds too silly to be taken as anything other than a hugely ambitious, goofy boyhood dream. There's merit in that and the film closes in on success without quite getting there.

One thing I found particularly amusing in the light of Close Encounters:

When Richard Dreyfuss gets on that alien ship, he's realizing a dream harbored since his early boyhood, a perfect moment where the risk matches his wonder.

When Gary Sinise gets on that alien ship, he's doing so as a kind of afterthought; "Well, shit, my dead wife said on that one video that I was intended to go to distant lands so here I go bye guys THE END."

Never, ever trust a movie that uses the dreaded cliche of Painful Memories: The Convenient Videotape. Every mourning parent, ever bereaved spouse... why, why oh why do they always watch those last birthday parties, those bittersweet baby showers?


Same rating, it just can't be helped but to think that De Palma could have done a bit more to give the overall movie the sense of awe and wonder those few scenes do. His upcoming film Passion looks like a throwback to his red period style films, most notably Femme Fatale and Dressed to Kill. This has me quite excited :3


Wed Aug 29, 2012 1:35 am
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Hail the Conquering Hero

A Preston Sturges "sort of" war film that explores the idea of hero worship during WWII, and also has quite a bit to say about phoniness. Oddly, thematically, I was somewhat reminded of The Catcher in the Rye, although there's no Holden Caufield type. The film is mostly played as a comedy with moments of drama sprinkled in. It's a really good movie and shows off Sturges' greatest strength, which is his ability to make fast faced, in your face comedic movies whose ideas just kind of wash over you as you watch. There's a lot of tongue in cheek irony in the film's images and Sturges uses this to great effect to make his point. This is just a really well made movie and highly recommended.


Wed Aug 29, 2012 10:33 am
Director
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:56 pm
Posts: 1077
Location: Warner Robins, GA
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Bubba Ho-Tep Elvis Presley and John Kennedy try to solve a mystery involving a muumy sucking sould from residents at a sleepy East Texas nursing home. Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis play the two mimatched characters, but I didn't think it was all that great. Much like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, it took itself a lot more seriously than necessary. Considering the sheer lunancy of what was on screen, a little camp would have gone a long way here. Campbell's impression of Elvis was pretty good, but the film took a little bit too long to get going. I treally wanted to like this movie, but just couldn't.


Wed Aug 29, 2012 12:56 pm
Profile
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
DylnFan96818 wrote:
Bubba Ho-Tep Elvis Presley and John Kennedy try to solve a mystery involving a muumy sucking sould from residents at a sleepy East Texas nursing home. Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis play the two mimatched characters, but I didn't think it was all that great. Much like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, it took itself a lot more seriously than necessary. Considering the sheer lunancy of what was on screen, a little camp would have gone a long way here. Campbell's impression of Elvis was pretty good, but the film took a little bit too long to get going. I treally wanted to like this movie, but just couldn't.


Man, I love this movie. Sorry you didn't.


Wed Aug 29, 2012 5:07 pm
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:43 pm
Posts: 773
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MunichMan wrote:
DylnFan96818 wrote:
Bubba Ho-Tep Elvis Presley and John Kennedy try to solve a mystery involving a muumy sucking sould from residents at a sleepy East Texas nursing home. Bruce Campbell and Ossie Davis play the two mimatched characters, but I didn't think it was all that great. Much like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, it took itself a lot more seriously than necessary. Considering the sheer lunancy of what was on screen, a little camp would have gone a long way here. Campbell's impression of Elvis was pretty good, but the film took a little bit too long to get going. I treally wanted to like this movie, but just couldn't.


Man, I love this movie. Sorry you didn't.


Me too. That it took itself seriously, if it really ever did, was what made it so charming. The concept is campy enough to power the rest of the film, campy or no.

_________________
Which are you drinking? The water or the wave?


Wed Aug 29, 2012 5:58 pm
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:43 pm
Posts: 773
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JJoshay wrote:
Mark III wrote:
Mission To Mars -- **1/2

Brian De Palma's boyhood readings of Fantastic Adventures get a mixed-bag tribute in Mission To Mars, a visually inspired but sterile retread of Spielberg's brilliant Close Encounters of the Third Kind, itself inspired from the same material. De Palma matches every good or great idea (an amazing single shot that flies around the interior of a space station at every possible angle, the thrilling events/visuals of the "attack" that warrants a rescue mission, the surprisingly harrowing attempted rescue of Tim Robbins during which the viewer, and the rest of the actors in the scene, get the feeling they're communicating with a ghost) with an equal and opposite bad idea (the preservation of kiddie sci-fi dialogue, across-the-board flat performances, and an end that too obviously tips its hat to the kind of science fiction that inspired the older, more homage-happy De Palma). Some might argue that the "bad ideas" are actually consistent with the rest of the good stuff, a sign that De Palma was willing to go the distance with this material. My take is that the project looks too beautiful and sounds too silly to be taken as anything other than a hugely ambitious, goofy boyhood dream. There's merit in that and the film closes in on success without quite getting there.

One thing I found particularly amusing in the light of Close Encounters:

When Richard Dreyfuss gets on that alien ship, he's realizing a dream harbored since his early boyhood, a perfect moment where the risk matches his wonder.

When Gary Sinise gets on that alien ship, he's doing so as a kind of afterthought; "Well, shit, my dead wife said on that one video that I was intended to go to distant lands so here I go bye guys THE END."

Never, ever trust a movie that uses the dreaded cliche of Painful Memories: The Convenient Videotape. Every mourning parent, ever bereaved spouse... why, why oh why do they always watch those last birthday parties, those bittersweet baby showers?


Same rating, it just can't be helped but to think that De Palma could have done a bit more to give the overall movie the sense of awe and wonder those few scenes do. His upcoming film Passion looks like a throwback to his red period style films, most notably Femme Fatale and Dressed to Kill. This has me quite excited :3


Well, to be back-handedly fair to De Palma, he was riffing on Spielberg and Co. so it's not unreasonable to think that the sense of wonder was borrowed. The technical aspects of the film were very good but let's face it, the acting is comatose. That leaves only the technical aspects to convey this wonder and, you know, it comes and goes but doesn't stick around long enough to make any assertions that De Palma is in awe of anything but tricky shots.

Berareinelli and Ebert blame the script but to place all the fault there is to deny the rest of the machinery. It's a barely above-average film; giving it four stars is more a statement of intellectual purpose than evaluation of the film.

_________________
Which are you drinking? The water or the wave?


Wed Aug 29, 2012 7:30 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16385 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 526, 527, 528, 529, 530, 531, 532 ... 820  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: GeoffHendricks and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr