Filters:
Run Time: 1:29
U.S. Home Release Date: 2019-05-18
MPAA Rating: "NR"
Genre: Drama
Director: Jean Vigo
Cast: Dita Parlo, Jean Daste, Michel Simon, Louis Lefebvre

Offers a glimpse of director Jean Vigo's promise and provides an important piece in the jigsaw puzzle of the early history of motion pictures.

As much a fantasy in the political realm as in the romantic one, "Long Shot" is a pleasant trifle that leaves behind a warm fuzzy feeling.

Despite the occasionally uneven pacing and some dramatically inert moments, the historical elements mesh effectively with the fictionalized action-oriented ones.

Run Time: 1:48
U.S. Release Date: 2019-04-12
MPAA Rating: "PG-13" (Profanity, Sexual Content)
Genre: Comedy
Director: Tina Gordon Chism
Cast: Marsai Martin, Issa Rae, Regina Hall

If it wasn’t for the charisma and screen presence of 13-year old Marsai Martin, "Little" would be damn near unwatchable.

Kids will enjoy it more than adults, although there’s enough to keep older viewers from zoning out (at least most of the time).

Although the movie’s strength occurs early in the proceedings, it tells a story worth being told.

Run Time: 1:48
U.S. Release Date: 2018-06-29
MPAA Rating: "PG"
Genre: Drama
Director: Debra Granik
Cast: Ben Foster, Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie

Occasionally uplifting and sometimes heartbreaking, it is nothing less than sublime.

Run Time: 1:42
U.S. Release Date: 2018-07-06
MPAA Rating: "NR" (Adult Themes)
Genre: Thriller
Director: Chris Crow
Cast: Mark Lewis Jones, Michael Jibson

An unconventional thriller that combines claustrophobic elements such as those found in submarine movies with the isolation aspects of productions like "Cast Away."

Run Time: 1:45
U.S. Release Date: 2018-05-11
MPAA Rating: "PG-13" (Profanity, Sexual Content)
Genre: Comedy
Director: Ben Falcone
Cast: Melissa McCarthy, Molly Gordon, Gillian Jacobs, Debby Ryan, Adria Arjona, Maya Rudolph, Luke Benward, Matt Walsh

Too dispiriting to be painful and too pointless to deserve the effort necessary for an additional word of opprobrium.

Director Harbaugh presents grief as it is, in all its pain and ugliness, rather than using the convenient, uplifting short-hand that Hollywood prefers.